Paperwork For Your Intakes

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Happy 2018! Every January I edit and revise all of my paperwork. As promised, here is a fifteen minute video blog of me editing my new client intake paperwork.  What do you think?


New Year New Paperwork?

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Annual Paperwork Cleanup

January is that beautiful time of year when I clean my counseling practice ‘house’ including my paperwork. This year was a little extreme because I literally got a new coat of paint and new floors. As you can see from the artsy filtered photo I took below, my office looks amazing.

But what about the things you can’t see in the photo? Is my paperwork up to date with the latest licensing laws? Have I changed my passwords on a regular basis? Have I checked to see if my credit card charges are accurate?

I’m not even joking – I called about a charge on my account I didn’t recognize and found out it was from something I THOUGHT I had closed in February 2017. The lesson? Watch your bank account.

January 2018 I will edit all of my new client paperwork, change my passwords, and update my bookkeeping. Today’s housekeeping item will be my new client intake Face Sheet. Catch my next blog and I will walk you through my editing process for our 2018 Service Agreement/Consent to Treat. Is it exciting? No, not really, but it’s only 3 minutes of your life and it will save you a lot of headaches down the road. When you’re ready you can even head to our store here to purchase the fully edited  paperwork you can download and customize for your practice. Enjoy!

Watch Me Edit My Face Sheet








If You Don’t Mind it DOES Matter

Learn about good habits at

If you are reading this blog and you are planning to be, or already are, a counselor, then you probably have a story that is your strength and your compass. The problem? Amazing stories start us, but too many of us lack the good habits and positive attitude that will sustain us and our practice.

Success is in the details.

Good habits and a positive attitude are important because without them you will lack the motivation to take care of the details. As a counselor, you have a lot to do after you graduate and there is no syllabus to guide and push you along. If you don’t take care of the details, the consequences can be dire:

  • Private practice owners must complete the paperwork for the correct legal structure or risk having a practice that is poorly protected against client lawsuits.
  • New graduates must interview supervisors or risk having dissatisfying or even dangerous supervision experiences.
  • Those making the leap from school counselor to LPC must take time to choose the right school to pick up licensing hours or risk delays during the application process.

Attitude is everything.

When I graduated with my master’s degree in counseling in 2000, I went right back to my teaching job. Why? I was scared to make the leap and start my counseling career. Private practice was my ‘someday’ idea. Basically I was an introvert who knew nothing about business. I had great study habits, zero business habits, and I had bills to pay.

Somehow, I learned about a cheesy-sounding book called “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” by Dale Carnegie. As a broke teacher/post grad it didn’t hurt that the book was in the public domain and I could download it for free. I set up an office in an upstairs bedroom, got the book, and did what I do best, started studying.

Create Good Habits.

HTWFAIP was written around the time of the second World War joining other self-help books like Napoleon Hill’s “Think and Grow Rich.” These books, with their very straightforward messages (shake hands firmly but not too tightly), and no-nonsense titles were designed with a purpose. American farms had been decimated by the dust bowl and men were having to find jobs in the city. World War two was coming to an end and men were coming home to compete for jobs and start families in the suburbs. These men had to learn how to survive in the post-agrarian economy and prosper. The premise was simple: change your mind, create good habits, and successfully make enough money to support your family. I liked that.

Turns out, Dale Carnegie was a counselor. He taught me how to have confidence and define success. I began to smile and make eye contact when I talked to people at networking events. I learned that if I could remember people’s names they were more likely to refer business to me. Thanks that that book, I learned the habits and attitudes that keep my business running successfully today.

Remember, your story and your passion only get you so far. Setting an intention, creating good habits, and having a good attitude lead to adjustments in time and resources (otherwise known as prioritizing). If you can prioritize then you can protect your license, provide excellent service to your clients, and have a great counseling career.


Keep on Growing: Why an Excellent Supervisor Refresher Course Matters

Supervisor Refresher Training Course

Keep on Growing: Why an Excellent Supervisor Refresher Course Matters


Email 1 (counselor): Do counselor supervisors need continuing education?

Email 2 (me): Yep

Email 3 (counselor): Will your Supervisor Refresher Course count for supervisor continuing education?

Email 4 (me): Yep

Email 5 (counselor): Do I have to travel to take it?

Email 6 (me): Nope. You can actually attend our live class virtually.

Two email exchanges later and this counselor had signed up for an amazing LPC/LMFT Supervisor Refresher Course for his continuing education.

Most states require continuing education for mental health providers holding the supervisor designation. The problem? Good ones are hard to find. Face to face supervisor refresher courses are held infrequently and usually require travel. Online courses can be sketchy at best, or contain out of date information, errors, and broken links to malfunctioning exams.

An excellent Supervisor Refresher Course will help you:
  • Understand the most recent law changes and professional organizations’ codes of ethics
  • Develop a solid remediation plan for difficult supervisees that will enhance their development and protect your license
  • Implement supervision interventions through a theory driven model
  • Work with any supervisee regardless of his or her level of skill development.
  • Utilize interventions and relationship dynamics to help guide supervisees towards a goal.
  • Engage supervisees in their own learning, career development, and professional identify development.
  • Feel confident and have fun supervising!

At Kate Walker Training we offer our Supervisor Refresher Courses four times each year. Each course is divided into modules:

  • Module 1: Conceptualizing supervision, supervisor roles and responsibilities, supervision methods and techniques including group supervision
  • Module 2: Roles for supervision and standards of practice and organizing the supervision experience/executive and administrative tasks including plan, contract, time for supervision, record keeping, and reporting
  • Module 3: Authorized counseling methods and practice and experience requirements for internship: LPC and LMFT Codes/Ethics side by side
  • Module 4: Standards of practice managing critical incidents in supervision, ethical decision making model, ethical dilemmas and legal Issues
  • Module 5: Multicultural Competencies and Ethics, Evaluation in Supervision

The best part about our Supervision Refresher Courses?

They are packed full of information for non-supervisors too! Our Module 3 Side by Side is one of our most popular courses because we go over the most up-to-date information that all counselors need to know.

Signing up for a refresher course is easy

Step 1 – go to

Step 2 – Click the ‘Register’ button

Step 3 – Check the boxes for the modules you’d like to attend.
Whether you are a counselor supervisor or not, if you feel a calling to help even more people and you are ready to become an even greater asset to your profession and your community, then the Supervisor Refresher Course is for you. It’s intended to be fun and engaging but also stimulating and in-depth.

Come immerse yourself and invest in your future, your profession, and your world.

Multiplying Streams of Income


As I meditate on those truths that we hold to be self-evident, I can’t help but wonder what happened to the private practice owner. Most of us who graduated from a counseling program received little to no business education. Because of that, while we are pursuing life, liberty, and happiness we are simultaneously struggling with finances, time, and burnout. I was going to list the Counselor’s Bill of Rights, but instead I came up with the Counselor’s List of Exceptions:

  1. Everyone gets sick and must take time off from work to heal, “Except the private practice owner – if she takes a sick day she will not make money.” 
  1. We will all slow down or retire as we age and become less physically able, “Except the private practice owner – he shall work until he dies because he lives off of everything he makes and the rest goes to taxes.”
  1. Savings accounts will be used to fix things when they break, “Except the private practice owner – since she has no savings (see number 2) she will have to max out her credit cards when the air conditioner finally goes out.”

This is not okay!

A common solution to this very common problem is to develop Multiple Streams of Income. Your other income sources will not only provide cash you can use for a rainy day, they can fund a retirement account, or provide investment capital for your growing business.

Here are examples of some streams of income so your business keeps working even if you need a day off:

  1. Your supportive partner’s income. If you have a partner who supports you in your business endeavor, then his/her income can be the cushion you will need if you have to step away from work, or if an emergency hits.
  2. Don’t quit your day job. If you are trained as a teacher, offer to teach online courses or one day per week at a local university. If you are trained as a musician, offer private lessons or take weekend gigs.
  3. Become a LPC/LMFT Supervisor. Interns must have 18 months to 2 years of supervision and rates can range from $40 to $100 per hour.
  4. Monetize your website. Is there a product you love and would love to offer to your clients? Become an affiliate and offer those products on your website (follow your state’s laws and ethics codes).
  5. Get creative. You can develop courses for parents, offer online continuing education to your peers, or give talks where you sell materials you have developed.
  6. Combine altruism and entrepreneurism. ‘Altrepreneurism’ is a business model used by companies like Tom’s Shoes and employs a ‘givers gain’ philosophy. One example might be to use interns to deliver affordable counseling to your community in exchange for free supervision from you. You receive additional client income when you aren’t in your office and your interns get free supervision. We have a wonderful example of this and you can learn more here on our Ann’s Place website.